Ice and the fight against swelling, a long story! (part 2)

Last week we talked about the origins of the benefits of ice; today we complete our “journey” back in time, with the second part of the article

Written Tuesday, by Emanuele Mortarotti

Welcome back on Dispotech, your disposable excellence blog.

 Last week we talked about the origins of the benefits of ice; today we complete our “journey” back in time, with the second part of the article, inspired by a piece published on bellefleurphysio.com.

 

R.I.C.E  is it working or not?

RICE is the English acronym used to remind people of the steps to fight inflammation: R stands for Rest, I  for Ice, C  for Compression and E for Elevation.

These methods have been used for a long time -a time that has proved the wise right: in principle, they have not lost their validity - despite the great advances in medicine and the many self-medication drugs that are now available on the market.

There are, however, some precautions to be observed to recover as soon as possible. Let’s see more specifically what this R.I.C.E is!

 

  • Rest: rest is the same as immobilizing the area affected by the swelling by not moving. However, a little muscle activation is needed for the oedema to go away. So resting is fine, but only for a short time and as long as the pain persists and is too acute to move. After that, it is advisable to activate the muscles close to the painful area: this helps to improve and speed up the healing process.
  • Ice: Applying an ice pack helps slowing the blood flow to the area affected by the swelling, as well as relieving the pain.
  • Compression: The purpose of compression is to provide additional pressure on the lymphatic system to accelerate the process of evacuation of the swelling. Using this technique alone, it will not help to achieve the objective: although it is an excellent remedy, it should be combined with a little muscle activity, which will help to push the liquid into the lymphatic system and then into the general circulation.
  • Elevation: Slightly lifting the part affected by the swelling may help to eliminate (part of) the problem.

 

So, what do you think about this article? Do you practice any of the above activities to eliminate swelling? Let us know the ice benefits you prefer by writing to the team Dispotech!

Emanuele Mortarotti
Author Emanuele Mortarotti

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