Future trends in the medical industry

Today on the Dispotech blog, we will address trends in the medical industry that have revolutionised 2020 and, we're convinced, will be increasingly present and effective in the near future. To do so, we use the support of an interesting article published on boardofinnovation.com.

Written Monday, by Emanuele Mortarotti

Today on the Dispotech blog, we will address trends in the medical industry that have revolutionised 2020 and, we're convinced, will be increasingly present and effective in the near future. To do so, we use the support of an interesting article published on boardofinnovation.com.

 

We already know very well that medical and scientific evolution would not be possible without technology - which also has a significant impact on our daily lives. Trends in the medical sector include 3D printing, IoT (Internet of Things), machine learning and natural language processing. Despite the great progress and constant changes in these innovations, what has changed this year and will change in the future is the way users will approach them.

Among the many pieces of personal information we share on (and through) the web, health-related information remains the most problematic. While many users share their health and well being data without difficulty, there is still a large part of the world’s population that does not trust technology enough to “give in” to applications and devices that collect this kind of strictly personal information.

Here, among the trends of the future, there is certainly a desire by manufacturers and suppliers to create safer products: at stake is the digitisation of the healthcare sector, a fundamental move for the planet.

Here is a list of trends that were in place in 2020 and have come to stay and modify the medical sector of tomorrow.

 

  1. Reversing the technology gap.

The number of scandals involving big tech companies in recent years, have not worked favourably towards building a relationship of trust between users and technology. The problem is that a large number of people do not trust sharing their personal information on the web. According to a survey conducted two years ago in the US, Americans are uneasy about disclosing their sensitive data to large technological companies.

At the same time, another survey conducted in the UK revealed the other major problem which must be solved: people do not understand the regulations protecting users and their privacy and, for this reason, tend not to trust technology applications related to health.

Lack of trust is a major obstacle to progress. Therefore, reversing the technology gap is a major challenge which has been under discussion since 2020 and will be continuing for the foreseeable future. Major world-leading tech companies and institutions will have to work together towards making health digitisation a transparent topic capable of conveying trust.

 

  1. Data Sharing

Sharing data and information can help to better track the general health of the population. This is because the more information we have, the easier it is for the health system to get an overall picture of everyone's health, to prevent illness and provide better care to patients.

Sharing data regarding health is also good for research (which can use said data to pursue studies) and pharmaceutical companies (which can predict diseases and medical conditions in a given geographic area).

 

  1. 5G

Thanks to the speed of 5G connectivity, it will be possible to give a boost to on-line doctor visits. A higher quality and faster internet connection can make visits taking place via a smart phone or PC screen less artificial.

 

These are just a few of the trends that have characterized 2020 and will change the future of the medical industry. What do you think about this article? Contact Dispotech and give us your opinion.

Emanuele Mortarotti
Author Emanuele Mortarotti

Manager

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