Benefits of an ice massage

Today on the Dispotech blog we are going to talk about ice massages, i.e. massages using ice packs or ice - which, as we know, can have outstanding health benefits.

Written Friday, by Emanuele Mortarotti

Today on the Dispotech blog we are going to talk about ice massages, i.e. massages using ice packs or ice - which, as we know, can have outstanding health benefits. To find out more about this practice we avail ourselves of the support of an article published on healthfully.com. Have a great read!

 

Good news from the web: according to the Sports Injury Info website, giving a massage with the help of an ice pack can help the body in many ways. Here are some of them:

  • it reduces swelling and inflammation;
  • it reduces pain following a bump or a fall;
  • it is indicated for both acute and chronic conditions.

 

Certified athletic trainer Terry Zeigler of SportsMD.com, interviewed in the source article, is also very convinced of the effectiveness of ice pack massages. Zeigler claims that the vasoconstriction and pain-relieving action of the cold helps to reduce swelling and pain. It appears as if by applying ice, tissues are 'put to sleep', which in turn slows down the muscle spasms causing pain.

Ice massage is also very useful in post-operative care, helping to reduce the discomfort (swelling, pain, etc.) experienced by patients after surgery.

 

According to studies published by the American College of Sports Medicine, there is a real medical condition affecting sportsmen and women after very intensive training: delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Many people, though, tend to downplay the significance of this condition as being associated with simple muscle pain which may occur after several days of consistent exertion. DOMS is different: the pain can be so intense as to make even simple everyday movements difficult. Even though it is estimated that DOMS decreases after 72 hours, it is advisable to consult a specialised doctor who can recommend a therapy to help sufferers cope with days of intense pain and significantly improve their quality of life.

According to the Sports Injury Bulletin website, ice massages and cryotherapy can be good allies against this type of acute pain, although some studies are still in progress.

 

And what about you, have you ever performed massages with ice packs or ice to relieve muscle pain or to reduce swelling? Share your experience with team Dispotech

Emanuele Mortarotti
Author Emanuele Mortarotti

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